A Blank Canvass?


Puppies are not blank canvasses. Every experience will have been 'banked' by the nervous system, and early signs that the puppy may have physical or emotional concerns may have been inadvertently overlooked.

Early experiences, and natural biological developments during the adolescent phase, can result in struggles for both the dog, and the guardian.

ACE Adolesence helps you to understand the drives and desires of the adolescent dog, and gives you tips and techniques to support the dog and his family through this extraordinary stage.


Animal Centred Education


The techniques and approach that form Animal Centred Education have been developed over many years thanks to numerous adolescent dogs, including those in shelters, and those that have been fostered or raised at Tilley Farm.

This course will help you see the world through the eyes of the adolescent dog, and give you tips and techniques to support dogs through this phenomenal developmental stage.

And of course the focus is not purely on how we can educate the adolsecent dog - we should always be considering what we can learn from him.

Engage the Brain, Reduce the Pain


Adolescence is a painful time for many dogs. Low impact movement exercises, good observations, and paying attention to detail can help you modify many normal behaviours that may not be conducive to harmonious relationships with humans.


Support Bubble


Creating a support bubble helps your dog develop confidence, and will open up his world.

Learning Skills


Teaching new skills within ACE Free Work enables you to work at a pace to suit your dog, and recognise what will help him stay engaged with you when out in the big wide world.


This course is closed for enrollment.

Body Talk


ACE Body Work, including TTouch, is an important part of Animal Centred Education.

Vigorous body contact such as patting, and ruffling the coat and ears, is one of the primary triggers for excitement, mouthing, or over arousal.

Gentle body contact can support the growing canine, and identify areas that may warrant further veterinary investigations.